Tips for writing crisp and concise B2B content

Do you know how to sharpen your writing, make it crisp, focused and to the point?

Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash

In journalism, we talk about ‘tightening-up copy’ or making it ‘punchy’.

Copy that is ‘wordy’ or ‘flabby’ can quickly lose readers’ interest.

And there are a few easy ways to make sure that your writing is concise.

First is to look for unnecessary words such as ‘actually’ and ‘really’. Or instances when you can use one word instead of three such as ‘in order to’ instead of ‘to’.

I’m working on a big editing project at the moment, it’s several thousand words long and needs cutting back.

The initial sweep through will inevitably pick up a good handful of unnecessary words that can easily be cut out.

They can creep in when you are writing copy from scratch but as long as you know how to spot them when you review your copy it doesn’t matter.

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Why you should put customer benefits first in content

This is quite a common mistake professional service businesses make when writing about their services.

They tell people what they do, then they tell their audience why it is important (what is in for them).

Or worse they skip addressing the ‘what’s in for me’ altogether and just talk about what they do.

Orange megaphone on an orange background
Photo by Oleg Laptev on Unsplash

I saw a social media post recently which was aimed at selling a particular business service.

However, the post started something like: ‘At Jones & Co we have an expert team of widget analysts’.

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A good example of rewarding brand loyalty (and good copywriting)

Abel and Cole rewarding loyalty.jeg

πŸ‘ Abel & Cole.

I may be a regular customer but that doesn’t mean I don’t review the value I get from my weekly fruit and veg box delivery.

Abel & Cole don’t wait for me to cancel or reduce my order, instead, they occasionally send ‘A Little Freebie’ which makes me feel valued as a customer.

But not only that, the friendly note they put in with my freebie directs me to their website to a blog post with handy tips for upcycling the packaging.

So to recap:

πŸ‘‰ They have made me feel valued.

πŸ‘‰ They’ve given me another reason to visit their website.

πŸ‘‰ They have reminded me of their sustainability credentials which reinforce the brand image and appeals to my own values.

πŸ‘‰ Given me useful information/fun ideas.

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How to avoid writing fluffy content

Why you should park the ego when writing B2B content

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Photo by Kaitlyn Baker on Unsplash

B2B content writing is an exercise in parking the ego.

There’s a lot of talk about content that adds value but in order to add value, you need to focus on your target audience and what is valuable and interesting to them.

It’s not about putting yourself and business first but putting your audience – and the point of interest – first.

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How I got a portfolio career

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Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

Last year when I was exploring what I wanted to do next in my career I met with a careers advisor who suggested a ‘portfolio career’ might be the direction to go.

I wasn’t entirely sure what a portfolio career was and how you approached getting one but looking back over the past 12 months of self-employment I now know.

It’s happened by stealth rather than design, people asking me if I can take on certain work.

My ‘portfolio’ of work to date covers a lot that is obvious but also many areas I hadn’t initially considered as a freelance:

β€’ Content writing

β€’ Copywriting

β€’ Ideas generation/content strategy

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