Writing the right content for your audience

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What’s the story? It seems like an easy question but if people aren’t reading your content then perhaps you haven’t got the answer quite right.

A common mistake is to leapfrog the audience and focus the story – the angle of your content – on what you find interesting.

But you can’t assume that people will share your enthusiasm for what you have to say or have been doing.

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How to make ‘interesting’ content more engaging

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Photo by Diego PH on Unsplash

The word ‘interesting’ is overused when posting on platforms like LinkedIn.

Or rather it isn’t used effectively.

You’ve seen the posts:

“Really interesting panel on X last night” [Insert slightly blurry picture of a panel taken from a distance]

Or

“Really interesting article.” [Insert link to an article].

It’s quick. It’s easy. We’ve all done it. I’ve done it.

But what purpose is it serving other than to fill a gap in your feed?

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Do you have something to say?

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Opinion pieces have been part of my working life for many years.

As a journalist on a weekly business magazine, I used to commission and edit guest columns. Now as a freelance, I ghost-write them for clients who don’t have the time or find writing difficult or a chore. 

I also help people get better at writing them as part of my in-house writing workshops.

Common mistake

When I was an editor and people pitched their opinion piece ideas to me, the most common mistake was an obvious one: Their idea lacked an actual opinion.

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Are you making the most of your events coverage?

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You’ve spent months organising your event and getting the right people to come along but does your coverage effectively leverage the time, effort and costs involved?

A good write-up broadens the audience and life of your event.

I’ve seen some great coverage… but there is a lot that really misses a trick.

Is that the best you can say?

Talking about ‘packed rooms’ and ‘great turnout’ is an easy way to show success but is that the best or most interesting thing you can say?

If you are hosting the sort of event designed to showcase thought-leadership, share knowledge or challenge thinking, what did people learn from attending?

What were the ‘take-aways’?

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A good example of rewarding brand loyalty (and good copywriting)

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👏 Abel & Cole.

I may be a regular customer but that doesn’t mean I don’t review the value I get from my weekly fruit and veg box delivery.

Abel & Cole don’t wait for me to cancel or reduce my order, instead, they occasionally send ‘A Little Freebie’ which makes me feel valued as a customer.

But not only that, the friendly note they put in with my freebie directs me to their website to a blog post with handy tips for upcycling the packaging.

So to recap:

👉 They have made me feel valued.

👉 They’ve given me another reason to visit their website.

👉 They have reminded me of their sustainability credentials which reinforce the brand image and appeals to my own values.

👉 Given me useful information/fun ideas.

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How to avoid writing fluffy content