9 ways to make your B2B content stand out

Content marketing can be hugely effective but with so much content vying for peoples attention how do you get your carefully crafted words noticed?

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There is a misconception that B2B content has to be written and presented in a certain way.

If you step away from the preconceived ideas and take a different path there are lots of ways you can easily make your content stand out from the crowd – and more readable.

Here are 9 ideas to get you started:

  1. Make sure your headline is firing on all cylinders

Your headline needs to tell people what the piece is about and intrigue them so they want to find out more. People don’t click through to read out of charity or mild curiosity, so your headline has to be something they think might be interesting, useful or entertaining.

2. Tell stories

People love stories, it’s human. Writing in a way that tells a story, that takes readers on a journey can be a really compelling way to present information.

3. Use quotes

A pithy quote can grab attention, particularly if it is a view that seems initially incongruous to popular opinion. Use in a headline or as an opener for the piece.

4. Talk about the process

So much B2B content is focused on the end result of your work but there is great value in talking about how you got there, decisions made, problems solved, lessons learned.

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Ways to avoid using the word ‘delighted’ in press releases

My blog post on what a press release is and isn’t got a lot of comments over on LinkedIn about the use of the word ‘delighted’ – or rather why people disliked it.

So I thought I’d write a quick guide to how you can avoid saying you are ‘delighted’ in your press release.

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To quickly recap why it shouldn’t be used, no one expects you NOT to be delighted (or cares that you are).

And it’s a waste of an opportunity to say something more interesting and meaningful – which is more likely to get used by a journalist.

So I’ve come up with some quick ways to avoid saying you are ‘delighted’ and add more value to your press release quotes.

These are mostly property focused (because thats the industry I work with) but the underlying ideas are interchangeable for all sorts of businesses:

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Why writing about your failures can help you stand out

Do you write about your failures as part of you content marketing?

It might feel counterintuitive particularly when a lot of business communications are about success but it can really help you stand out from the crowd.

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And here’s why.

Not everything goes to plan. Not every plan is successful.

I was listening to an interview with Jamie Oliver yesterday and he reckoned his failure rate was at around 40%.

What made it a really interesting listen is in how he talked about his failures – he talked about what he learned from them.

Learning from failures

No one gets everything right first time. We learn from what doesn’t work.

We figure out why something wasn’t a success and we adjust our approach, our strategy, our thinking. And we try again.

5 tips for writing LinkedIn content

Graffiti style social media icons - heart, thumbs up and smiley face. Painted in black and white on a silver background
Photo by George Pagan III on Unsplash

Are you on LinkedIn? I’ve been properly using it as a social media platform for work for nearly a year now and I love it.

It’s great for learning new stuff, making new connections…and getting business leads.

And it’s fun.

If you’ve haven’t yet unleashed the power of it as a business networking platform then what are you waiting for?

A few things I’ve learned along the way about LinkedIn content that might help you:

1. LinkedIn likes native posts, that is stuff you’ve written or created yourself rather than shared from within the platform or from other sites.

2. More engagement on your posts means more visibility, so write content that invites people to interact or comment.

3. Don’t just tell people what you’ve been doing or your successes. Imagine going on a date with someone who only talked about themselves, dull eh?

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Do you target your content pitches and press releases appropriately?

multiple arrows being fired into a wall
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Earlier this year Hubspot surveyed 500 journalists about PR tactics for pitching stories that were counter-productive (link to piece at the bottom).

That’s the polite way of saying they drew up a list of what irks journalists.

I’m sure there won’t be anything on the list to surprise seasoned PR’s – and this isn’t a post about dos and don’ts* – but there is one broader lesson: ‘Know the audience’.

Research the audience

When pitching to journalists this means not only knowing their patch but also understanding the publication/website and who its audience is.

I’ve worked with many brilliant PR’s over the years but the one who regularly sent me stories about window boxes wasn’t one of them.

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