What makes a clickable headline

A piece of paper in a type writer which has the word 'news' written at the top.
Photo by Markus Winkler on Unsplash

People will decide whether to click on a story or article based on the headline.

You could write a brilliant article, blog post or press release, but if the headline doesn’t ‘sell’ the content to your target audience, it won’t matter.

Think of all the headlines you scroll past vs what you click on to read.

Headlines are so important that some national newspapers and magazines have specialist writers called sub-editors to create them.

So what makes a clickable headline?

Different styles work for different types of content, but the key is creating some intrigue or tapping into an emotion or need.

Headlines also need to give enough information so that the reader knows what they’ll get from reading on.

Here are four headline examples and a breakdown of how they work:

1. Pique interest news headline

This headline, from the North West Business Insider, tells the reader enough, so they know what the story is about but leaves out certain information to help create curiosity.

It tells the reader that it is a development deal, the size of the deal and where it is. What it doesn’t say is who was involved in the deal, the type of development and the details of the transaction.

To find that information, the reader has to click through to the story.

News headlines are a balancing act. Reveal too much, and there is no reason to click through; reveal too little, and curiosity isn’t pricked.

2. Challenge or surprise headline

Presenting a statement in a headline that is incongruous with common thinking or trend is a great way of getting people clicking to read on.

This headline on a LinkedIn article by Daniel Paulusma creates different levels of intrigue depending on your views of hybrid working.

It appears to challenge the thinking of advocates of hybrid working, potentially highlighting something they’ve missed: Am I wrong? ‘What is the evidence?’

Continue reading “What makes a clickable headline”

Personality in B2B content and why its good

Some thoughts on showing personality in B2B content and if it’s ‘professional’

There seems to be a fear about showing personality in B2B content. Either that it doesn’t sound professional or makes people feel exposed.

Showing some personality can be using a particular turn of phrase or choosing more conversational words in your writing.

Or perhaps using an anecdote or talking about a personal experience or how something made you feel, something that shows some of your personality.

What is ‘professional’?

First of all, being professional isn’t about sounding or dressing a certain way.

Continue reading “Personality in B2B content and why its good”

60-seconds on…How to encourage B2B content engagement

Some ideas for encouraging B2B content engagement

Engagement on your B2B content – likes, comments, shares – means the algorithms will give it more visibility.

Why? Because B2B content engagement is an indicator, it’s of interest or value (or entertaining) and therefore worth showing to some more people.

And that goes for social media posts and stuff on your website.

So how can you encourage engagement?

Here is 60-seconds worth of ideas covering ease of engagement, responding to engagement and CTAs (call to action).

How do you encourage engagement on your B2B content?

Want more B2B content tips? Check out my recent posts:

Or sign up for my monthly digest of B2B content tips. The first edition of the B2B Content Clinic newsletter is coming soon.

Want people to stop scrolling and click on your B2B content?

Promoting your content on social media can be a great way of increasing engagement with your B2B content but there is an art to writing posts that get people to stop scrolling and click through to your content.

A row of people in suits all looking at their smart phones - picture is a close up of their hands.
Photo by camilo jimenez on Unsplash

Think of LinkedIn or Twitter as like a huge crowd with everyone shouting to be heard. You need to craft a few sentences that stand out and grab attention.

It’s not simply a case telling people you’ve written something and they will click through and read.

Doing this just lets down all the hard work you put into your creating your B2B content.

Look at it this way. If you were selling a book door to door, you wouldn’t simply say: “I have a book, do you want to buy it?”

You’d talk about what was in the book and why it was interesting or useful.

And yet it isn’t unusual to see a social media post that says something like: ‘Our latest report on the office market is out’.

Now context, the business brand or person writing the post might help.

But it may not.

And if you are relying solely on who you are to ‘sell’ your content to potential readers, then you are missing out.

Hint: People may not know who you are or have read anything you’ve written before.

You want to make people stop and pay attention and to do that you need to capture their interest or intrigue about your content, so people want to click through and read it.

Here are some ideas for how you can do that:

Continue reading “Want people to stop scrolling and click on your B2B content?”

Why engagement is an important part of content marketing

priscilla-du-preez-623040-unsplash
Photo by Priscilla Du Preez on Unsplash

Producing meaningful and engaging content doesn’t just mean writing native posts but also what you share and how you comment on others content.

Content helps with visibility but so does engagement with what others are producing and the two need to go hand in hand, particularly here on LinkedIn.

Liking and naked sharing – sharing without comment – will only get you so far as will writing ‘empty’ comments on posts.

There is a place for saying something encouraging or congratulatory, of course.

Missing a trick

However, if you are sharing and commenting without qualifying the reason for the share or adding value with your comment then you are missing a trick. Continue reading “Why engagement is an important part of content marketing”