Want people to stop scrolling and click on your B2B content?

Promoting your content on social media can be a great way of increasing engagement with your B2B content but there is an art to writing posts that get people to stop scrolling and click through to your content.

A row of people in suits all looking at their smart phones - picture is a close up of their hands.
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Think of LinkedIn or Twitter as like a huge crowd with everyone shouting to be heard. You need to craft a few sentences that stand out and grab attention.

It’s not simply a case telling people you’ve written something and they will click through and read.

Doing this just lets down all the hard work you put into your creating your B2B content.

Look at it this way. If you were selling a book door to door, you wouldn’t simply say: “I have a book, do you want to buy it?”

You’d talk about what was in the book and why it was interesting or useful.

And yet it isn’t unusual to see a social media post that says something like: ‘Our latest report on the office market is out’.

Now context, the business brand or person writing the post might help.

But it may not.

And if you are relying solely on who you are to ‘sell’ your content to potential readers, then you are missing out.

Hint: People may not know who you are or have read anything you’ve written before.

You want to make people stop and pay attention and to do that you need to capture their interest or intrigue about your content, so people want to click through and read it.

Here are some ideas for how you can do that:

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How to fashion your content for your audience

We’ve all tried on clothes only to realise they weren’t designed for our particular size and shape. The designer, it seems, was thinking of someone else wearing their clothes and the same thing can happen with B2B content – if you don’t focus on your audience.

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I’m 5ft 2 (on a good day) which means a lot of clothes are too long. I don’t buy clothes that don’t fit well.

But it’s not the clothing designers fault. They can’t make every garment suit every size and shape. They develop their designs for a brand’s particular target customer base – their size and tastes.

As consumers, we find the brands that target us; we get to know which ones generally offer clothing to our dimensions and style. We buy from these brands because they offer us what we want and need.

And that’s the space your B2B content needs to occupy. Your content marketing strategy needs to target a specific audience and speak directly to them. One size fits all isn’t going to get you the results you want.

Clarity on your audience

Which means you need to be clear on who your target audience is. And it is likely you will have more than one target audience depending on what you want to achieve.

For example, a house builder or developer might want to target potential investors and joint venture partners. But they will also want to target house buyers or occupiers.

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How to write about stuff that goes wrong

You succeed by trial and error. Practice and fail and practice some more. And yet when reading about business it would be easy to think that every job or project was a success from start to finish.

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There are good reasons to write about failures and struggles, as I explain in this post but it might feel counterintuitive or even uncomfortable.

So here are some ways to help you feel comfortable writing about the not so successful stuff so that you can lift the lid on a whole swathe of new content and business insight.

First of all think of failing as just part of the learning process.

The star basketball player misses a lot of hoops to get that one winning shot. A lot of work went into getting that winning shot. A lot of mistakes, a lot of adjustments and a lot of training to get better.

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9 ways to make your B2B content stand out

Content marketing can be hugely effective but with so much content vying for peoples attention how do you get your carefully crafted words noticed?

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There is a misconception that B2B content has to be written and presented in a certain way.

If you step away from the preconceived ideas and take a different path there are lots of ways you can easily make your content stand out from the crowd – and more readable.

Here are 9 ideas to get you started:

  1. Make sure your headline is firing on all cylinders

Your headline needs to tell people what the piece is about and intrigue them so they want to find out more. People don’t click through to read out of charity or mild curiosity, so your headline has to be something they think might be interesting, useful or entertaining.

2. Tell stories

People love stories, it’s human. Writing in a way that tells a story, that takes readers on a journey can be a really compelling way to present information.

3. Use quotes

A pithy quote can grab attention, particularly if it is a view that seems initially incongruous to popular opinion. Use in a headline or as an opener for the piece.

4. Talk about the process

So much B2B content is focused on the end result of your work but there is great value in talking about how you got there, decisions made, problems solved, lessons learned.

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Why writing about your failures can help you stand out

Do you write about your failures as part of your content marketing?

It might feel counterintuitive particularly when a lot of business communications are about success but it can really help you stand out from the crowd.

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And here’s why.

Not everything goes to plan. Not every plan is successful.

For every success, there is a history of things not quite going to plan.  I was listening to an interview with Jamie Oliver yesterday and he reckoned his failure rate was at around 40%.

What made it a really interesting listen is in how he talked about his failures – he talked about what he learned from them.

Learning from failures

No one gets everything right the first time – or the second. We learn from what doesn’t work.

We figure out why something wasn’t a success and we adjust our approach, our strategy, our thinking. And we try again.